Archive for January, 2010

OCCULT POWERS ARE MORE A HINDRANCE THAN A HELP TO GOD-VISION

ONCE upon a time a sadhu acquired great occult
powers. He was vain about them. But he was a
good man and had some austerities to his credit.
One day the Lord, disguised as a holy man, came
to him and said, “Revered sir, I have heard that you
have great occult powers.” The sadhu received the
Lord cordially and offered him a seat. Just then an
elephant passed by. The Lord, in the disguise of
the holy man, said to the sadhu, “Revered sir, can
you kill this elephant if you like?” The sadhu said,
“Yes, it is possible.” So saying he took a pinch of
dust, muttered some mantras over it, and threw it
at the elephant. The beast struggled a while in pain
and then dropped dead. The Lord said: “What
power you have! You have killed the elephant!”
The sadhu laughed. Again the Lord spoke: “Now,
can you revive the elephant?” “That too is
possible,” replied the sadhu. He threw another
pinch of charmed dust at the beast. The elephant
writhed about a little and came back to life. Then
the Lord said: “Wonderful is your power. But may

ONCE upon a time a sadhu acquired great occult

powers. He was vain about them. But he was a

good man and had some austerities to his credit.

One day the Lord, disguised as a holy man, came

to him and said, “Revered sir, I have heard that you

have great occult powers.” The sadhu received the

Lord cordially and offered him a seat. Just then an

elephant passed by. The Lord, in the disguise of

the holy man, said to the sadhu, “Revered sir, can

you kill this elephant if you like?” The sadhu said,

“Yes, it is possible.” So saying he took a pinch of

dust, muttered some mantras over it, and threw it

at the elephant. The beast struggled a while in pain

and then dropped dead. The Lord said: “What

power you have! You have killed the elephant!”

The sadhu laughed. Again the Lord spoke: “Now,

can you revive the elephant?” “That too is

possible,” replied the sadhu. He threw another

pinch of charmed dust at the beast. The elephant

writhed about a little and came back to life. Then

the Lord said: “Wonderful is your power. But may

I ask you one thing? You have killed the elephant

and you have revived it. But what has that done for

you? Do you feel uplifted by it? Has it enabled you

to realize God?” Saying this, the Lord vanished.

Subtle are the ways of Dharma. One cannot realize

God. if one has even the least trace of desire. A

thread cannot pass through the eye of a needle if it

has the smallest fibre sticking out.

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The Impermanent

From Chapter 5

“One may enter the world after attaining discrimination and dispassion. In the ocean of the world there are six alligators: lust, anger, and so forth. But you need not fear the alligators if you smear your body with turmeric before you go into the water. Discrimination and dispassion are the turmeric. Discrimination is the knowledge of what is real and what is unreal. It is the realization that God alone is the real and eternal Substance and that all else is unreal, transitory, impermanent. And you must cultivate intense zeal for God. You must feel love for Him and be attracted to Him. The gopis of Vrindavan felt the attraction of Krishna.

From Chapter 13

“Money enables a man to get food and drink, build a house, worship the Deity, serve devotees and holy men, and help the poor when he happens to meet them. These are the good uses of money. Money is not meant for luxuries or creature comforts or for buying a position in society.

“People practise various Tantrik disciplines to acquire supernatural powers. How mean such people are! Krishna said to Arjuna, ‘Friend, by acquiring one of the eight siddhis you may add a little to your power, but you will not be able to realize Me.’ One cannot get rid of maya as long as one exercises supernatural powers. And maya begets egotism.

“Body and wealth are impermanent. Why go to so much trouble for their sakes? Just think of the plight of the hathayogis. Their attention is fixed on one ideal only-longevity. They do not aim at the realization of God at all. They practise such exercises as washing out the intestines, drinking milk through a tube, and the like, with that one aim in view.

From Chapter 15

“You all know from your experience how impermanent the world is. Look at it this way. How many people have come into the world and again passed away! People are born and they die. This moment the world is and the next it is not. It is impermanent. Those you think to be your very own will not exist for you when you close your eyes in death. Again, you see people who have no immediate relatives, and yet for the sake of a grandson they will not go to Benares to lead a holy life. ‘Oh, what will become of my Haru then?’ they argue.:

The narrow channel first is made, and there the trap is set;

But open though the passage lies,

The fish, once safely through the gate,

Do not come out again.

Yet even though a way leads forth,

Encased within its own cocoon,

The worm remains to die.

This kind of world is illusory and impermanent.”

From Chapter 19

“The body is really impermanent. When my arm was broken I said to the Mother, ‘Mother, it hurts me very much.’ At once She revealed to me a carriage and its driver. Here and there a few screws were loose. The carriage moved as the driver directed it. It had no power of its own.

From Chapter 41

Only by renunciation is ignorance destroyed. The sun’s rays, falling on a lens, burn many objects. But if a room is dark inside, you cannot get that result: ‘you must come out of the room to use the lens.

“But some people live in the world even after attaining jnana. They see both what is inside and what is outside the room. The light of God illumines the world. Therefore with that light they can discriminate between good and bad, permanent and impermanent. The ignorant, who lead a worldly life without knowing God, are like people living in a house with mud walls.

With the help of a dim light they can see the inside of the house but nothing more. But those who live in the world after having attained Knowledge and realized God, are like people living in a glass house. They see the inside of the room and also all that is outside. The light from the sun of Knowledge enters strongly into the room. They perceive everything inside the room very clearly. They know what is good and what is bad, what is permanent and what is impermanent.

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Satchidananda – III

From Chapter 20

MANI MALLICK (to the Master): “What a big electric light they have at the exhibition! It makes us think how great He must be who has made such an electric light.”

MASTER. (to Mani): “But according to one view it is He Himself who has become everything. Even those who say that are He. It is Satchidananda Itself that has become all-the Creator, maya, the universe, and living beings.”…

The Master rested awhile. A devotee sat on the end of the small couch and gently stroked his feet. The Master said to him softly: “That which is formless again has form. One should believe in the forms of God also. By meditating on Kali the aspirant realizes God as Kali. Next he finds that the form merges in the Indivisible Absolute. That which is the Indivisible Satchidananda is verily Kali.”

From Chapter 32

“Three words-‘master’, ‘teacher’, and ‘father’-prick me like thorns. I am the son of God, His eternal child. How can I be a ‘father’? God alone is the Master and I am His instrument. He is the Operator and I am the machine.  “If somebody addresses me as guru, I say to him: ‘Go away, you fool! How can I be a teacher?’ There is no teacher except Satchidananda. There is no refuge except Him. He alone is the Ferryman to take one across the ocean of the world….

From Chapter 39

Sri Ramakrishna became silent. Resuming his reminiscences, he said:  “How many other visions I saw! But I am not permitted to tell them. Someone is shutting my mouth, as it were. I used to find no distinction between the sacred tulsi and the insignificant sajina leaf. The feeling of distinction was entirely destroyed. Once I was meditating under the banyan when I was shown a Musslman with a long beard. He came to me with rice in an earthen plate. He fed some other Musslmans with the rice and also gave me a few grains to eat. The Mother showed me that there exists only One, and not two. It is Satchidananda alone that has taken all these various forms; He alone has become the world and its living beings. Again, it is He who has become food.

From Chapter 44

MASTER (to M.): “Every now and then I think that the body is a mere pillow-case. The only real substance is the Indivisible Satchidananda.

From Chapter 47

“What Brahman is cannot be described in words. Somebody once said that everything in the world has been made impure, like food that has touched the tongue, and that Brahman alone remains undefiled. The meaning is this: All scriptures and holy books-the Vedas, the Puranas, the Tantras, and so forth-may be said to have been defiled because their contents have been uttered by the tongues of men; but what Brahman is no tongue has yet been able to describe. Therefore Brahman is still undefiled. One cannot describe in words the joy of play and communion with Satchidananda. He alone knows, who has realized it.”

From Chapter 51

Do you know what I see now? I see my body as a frame made of bamboo strips and covered with a cloth. The frame moves. And it moves because someone dwells inside it.

“Again, I see the body to be like a pumpkin with the seeds scooped out. Inside this body there is no trace of passion or worldly attachment. It is all very clean inside, and- ”

It became very painful for Sri Ramakrishna to talk further. He felt very weak. M. quickly guessed what the Master wanted to tell the devotees, and said, “And you are seeing God inside yourself.”

MASTER: “Both inside and outside. The Indivisible Satchidananda-I see It both inside and outside. It has merely assumed this sheath [meaning his body] for a support and exists both inside and outside. I clearly perceive this.”

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