Archive for September, 2010

COURT MARRIAGE AND YOU COURT SERVITUDE

TT is ‘woman and gold’ that binds man and robs –
*- him of his freedom. It is woman that creates the
need for gold. For woman one becomes the slave
of another, and so loses his freedom. Then he
cannot act as he likes.
The priests in the temple of Govindaji at Jaipur
were celibates at first, and at that time they had
fiery natures. Once the King of Jaipur sent for
them, but they didn’t obey him. They said to the
messenger, “Ask the king to come to see us.” After
consultation, the king and his ministers arranged
marriages for them. From then on the king didn’t
have to send for them.
They would come to him of themselves and say:
“Your Majesty, we have come with our blessings.
Here are the sacred flowers of the temple. Deign to

‘Kama-Kanchana’

(Lust and Gold)

It is ‘woman and gold’ that binds man and robs –

*- him of his freedom. It is woman that creates the

need for gold. For woman one becomes the slave

of another, and so loses his freedom. Then he

cannot act as he likes.

The priests in the temple of Govindaji at Jaipur

were celibates at first, and at that time they had

fiery natures. Once the King of Jaipur sent for

them, but they didn’t obey him. They said to the

messenger, “Ask the king to come to see us.” After

consultation, the king and his ministers arranged

marriages for them. From then on the king didn’t

have to send for them.

They would come to him of themselves and say:

“Your Majesty, we have come with our blessings.

Here are the sacred flowers of the temple. Deign to

accept them.” They came to the palace, for now

they always wanted money for this thing or

another—the building of a house, the rice-taking

ceremony of their babies, or the rituals connected

with the beginning of their children’s education.

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THE JAR OF DESIRE CAN NEVER BE FILLED UP

A BARBER who was passing under a haunted tree,
heard a voice say, “Will you accept seven jars full
of gold?” The barber looked around, but could see
no one. The offer of seven jars of gold, however,
roused his cupidity, and he cried aloud, “Yes, I
shall accept the seven jars.” At once came the
reply, “Go home, I have carried the jars to your
house.” The barber ran home in hot haste to verify
the truth of this strange announcement. And when
he entered the house, he saw the jars before him.
He opened them and found them all full of gold,
except the last one which was only half-full. A
strong desire now arose in the barber’s mind to fill
the seventh jar also for without it his happiness
was incomplete. He therefore converted all his
ornaments into gold coins and put them into the
jar; but the mysterious vessel was, as before,
unfilled. This exasperated the barber. Starving
himself and his family, he saved some amount
more and tried to fill the jar; but the jar remained
as before. So one day he humbly requested the
king to increase his pay, as his income was not
sufficient to maintain himself. Now the barber was
a favourite of the king, and as soon as the request
was made the king doubled his pay. All this pay he
saved and put into the jar, but the greedy jar
showed no signs of filling. At last he began to live
by begging from door to door, and his professional
income and the income from begging—all went
into the insatiable cavity of the mysterious jar.
Months passed, and the condition of the miserable
and miserly barber grew worse every day. Seeing
his sad plight the king asked him one day: “Hallo!
When your pay was half of what yon now get, you
were happy, cheerful and contented; but with
double that pay, I see you morose, care-worn and
dejected. What is the matter with you? Have you
got ‘the seven jars’?” The barber was taken aback
by this question and replied, “Your Majesty, who
has informed you of this?” The king said: “Don’t
you know that these are the signs of the person to
whom the Yaksha consigns the seven jars. He
offered me also the same jars, but I asked him
whether this money might be spent or was merely
to be hoarded. No sooner had T asked this
question than the Yaksha ran away without any
reply. Don’t you know that no one can spend that
money? It only brings with it the desire of
hoarding. Go at once and return the money.” The
barber was brought to his senses by this advice,
and he went to the haunted tree and said, “Take
back your gold, O Yaksha.” The Yaksha replied,
“All right.” When the barber returned home, he
found that the seven jars had vanished as
mysteriously as they were brought in, and with it
had vanished, his life-long savings too.
Those who do not understand the difference
between what is real expenditure and what is real
income, lose all they have.

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The Bane of Worldliness : THE ROOT OF ALL TROUBLES

In a certain place the fishermen were catching fish.
A kite swooped down and snatched a fish. At the
sight of the fish, about a thousand crows chased
the kite and made a great noise with their cawing.
Which-ever way the kite flew with the fish, the
crows followed it. The kite flew to the south and
the crows followed it there. The kite flew to the
north and still the crows followed after it. The kite
went east and west, but with the same result. As
the kite began to fly about in confusion, lo, the fish
dropped from its mouth. The crows at once let the
kite alone and flew after the fish. Thus relieved of
its worries, the kite sat on the branch of a tree and
thought: ‘That wretched fish was at the root of all
my troubles. I have now got rid of it and therefore
I am at peace.’
As long as a man has the fish, that is, worldly
desires, he must perform actions and consequently
suffer from worry, anxiety, and restlessness. No
sooner does he renounce these desires than his
activities fall away and he enjoys peace of soul.

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MASTER OF EVERYTHING, SLAVE OF SEX!

A JOB-SEEKER got tired of visiting the manager
in an office. He couldn’t get the job. The manager
said to him, “There is no vacancy now; but come
and f see me now and then.” This went on for a
long time, and the candidate lost all hope. One day
he told his tale of woe to a friend. The friend said:
“How stupid you are! Why are you wearing away
the soles of your feet going to that fellow? You had
better go to Golap. You will get the job
tomorrow.” “Is that so?” said the candidate. “I
am going right away.” Golap was the manager’s
mistress. The candidate called on her and said:
“‘Mother, I am in great distress. You must help me
out of it. 1 am the son of a poor brahmana

A JOB-SEEKER got tired of visiting the manager

in an office. He couldn’t get the job. The manager

said to him, “There is no vacancy now; but come

and  see me now and then.” This went on for a

long time, and the candidate lost all hope. One day

he told his tale of woe to a friend. The friend said:

“How stupid you are! Why are you wearing away

the soles of your feet going to that fellow? You had

better go to Golap. You will get the job

tomorrow.” “Is that so?” said the candidate. “I

am going right away.” Golap was the manager’s

mistress. The candidate called on her and said:

“‘Mother, I am in great distress. You must help me

out of it. I am the son of a poor brahmana

Where

else shall I go for help? Mother I have been out of

work many days. My children are about to starve to

death. I can get a job if you but say a word.” Golap

said to him, “Child, whom should I speak to?” She

said to herself: “Ah, the poor brahmana! He has

been suffering too much.” The candidate said to

her, “I am sure to get the job if you just put in a

word about it to the manager.” Golap said, “I shall

speak to him today and settle the matter.” The very

next morning a man called on the candidate and

said, “You are to work in the manager’s office,

from today.” The manager said to his English boss:

“This man is very competent. I have appointed

him. He will do credit to the firm.”

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